Semester Projects

(can be adapted to Bachelor or Master level)

Simulation of electron trajectories with finite element calculation
Available

Experimentally quantifying electric field distributions in functional materials using transmission electron microscopy is an ongoing challenge. Verification of the results can only occur in relation to simulated data. Finite element method (FEM) is a popular tool for numerically solving partial differential equations in two or three space variables and it can provide valuable information on the expected results. The aim of the project is the calculation of the electron deflection passing through the electric field produced in a capacitor using COMSOL Multiphysics software. In this project, the student will reproduce experimental conditions trying to understand how to improve the calculation in order to obtain comparable results.

Contact: Mr. Pierpaolo Ranieri
 
 
MEMs-based chips for in situ TEM applications
Reserved

The aim of this project is to fabricate MEMS-based chips for in situ TEM applications such as biasing, heating, and electrochemistry. The student will be introduced to MEMS technologies such as photolithography, etching process, thin film deposition, etc. The process of the chip fabrication will take place in the cleanroom at the Center of Micronanotechnology (CMi). The student is expected to understand the fundamentals of MEMS technologies and obtain hands-on experience of semiconductor processing. The MEMS processing skills obtained after this project are highly transferable especially in semiconductor industries. Previous hands-on experience in cleanroom is preferred for this project.

Contact: Mr. Morgan Binggeli
 
 
Simulating current distribution of lithium-ion battery reactions in microcells using finite element method
Reserved

The aim of this project is to develop a finite element method model simulating the electrochemical behavior of lithium-ion battery reactions occurring in liquid microcells used for liquid cell transmission electron microscopy measurements. The student will be introduced to COMSOL Multiphysics software, which is the software that will be used for performing the simulations. The student is expected to understand the fundamentals of electrochemistry and basics of finite element simulations.

Contact: Mr. Morgan Binggeli
 
 
Reducing the thickness of carbon electrodes
Reserved

The aim of this project is to perform dilution of a photoresist that is used to form glassy carbon microelectrodes for in-situ TEM electrochemical applications and optimization of photolithography and pyrolysis protocols. The student will acquire hands on experience in MEMS fabrication processes. Parameters to be optimized include spin coating conditions of diluted resist solutions and UV dose rate, as well as temperature, dwell time, and atmosphere of pyrolysis.

Contact: Ms. Saltanat Toleukhanova
 
 
Simulation of TEM images of defective Bi2Se3
Available

3D topological insulators like Bi2Se3 possess spin-locked conducting states at their surface which could find applications in spintronics, optoelectronics or quantum computing, among other fields. However, in practice, the presence of crystal defects as atom vacancies allows for a non-polarized current in the bulk, which hinders the applicability. While transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful tool to observe the local structure, the identification of defects may be a challenging task. In this project, the student will simulate TEM images of Bi2Se3 using JEMS software with various defects in order to serve as a roadmap for their identification via TEM experiments.

Contact: Dr. Saul Estandia